Correction

Correction: ‘Such a pleasant little sketch [...] of this irritable artist’: Julia Cartwright and the Reception of Andrea Mantegna in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain.

Author: Maria Alambritis (National Gallery)

  • Correction: ‘Such a pleasant little sketch [...] of this irritable artist’: Julia Cartwright and the Reception of Andrea Mantegna in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain.

    Correction

    Correction: ‘Such a pleasant little sketch [...] of this irritable artist’: Julia Cartwright and the Reception of Andrea Mantegna in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain.

    Author:

Abstract

A correction notice for the original article: Maria Alambritis, ‘“Such a pleasant little sketch […] of this irritable artist”: Julia Cartwright and the Reception of Andrea Mantegna in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain’, 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, 28 (2019) <https://doi.org/10.16995/ntn.825>.

Keywords: Correction notice

How to Cite:

Alambritis, M., (2023) “Correction: ‘Such a pleasant little sketch [...] of this irritable artist’: Julia Cartwright and the Reception of Andrea Mantegna in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain.”, 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century 2023(34). doi: https://doi.org/10.16995/ntn.10556

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Published on
27 Jun 2023

The following references to Mantegna’s ‘frescoes’ should be ‘canvases’ as these refer to the Triumphs of Julius Caesar.

So, on page 9, para. 1 of the original PDF publication,1 the following text:

Vasari had described this fresco cycle as Mantegna’s greatest achievement and the works continued to hold sway throughout the seventeenth century, being engraved numerous times […]. During the rebuilding of the royal apartments under the reign of William III, the new ‘Kings Gallery’ was designed not for Mantegna’s frescoes but for the cartoons of Raphael (Martindale, p. 111).

should read as follows:

Vasari had described this cycle as Mantegna’s greatest achievement and the works continued to hold sway throughout the seventeenth century, being engraved numerous times […]. During the rebuilding of the royal apartments under the reign of William III, the new ‘Kings Gallery’ was designed not for Mantegna’s canvases but for the cartoons of Raphael (Martindale, p. 111).

On page 9, para. 2 of the original publication, the following text:

Jameson insisted Mantegna’s frescoes were in especial need of greater attention and appreciation.

should read as follows:

Jameson insisted Mantegna’s canvases were in especial need of greater attention and appreciation.

On page 9, para. 3 of the original publication, the following text:

Yet Jameson’s description of the frescoes […]

should read as follows:

Yet Jameson’s description of the Triumphs […]

Notes

  1. Maria Alambritis, ‘“Such a pleasant little sketch […] of this irritable artist”: Julia Cartwright and the Reception of Andrea Mantegna in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain’, 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, 28 (2019) <https://doi.org/10.16995/ntn.825>. [^]